Welcome Cochrane Dollars!

 

Cochrane joined the community of thousands of complementary currencies around the world, when they launched Cochrane Dollars on May 19, 2017. The dollars are in bills of $1, $2, $5, $10, $20; they also made a special $150 bill in commemoration of Canada’s 150th birthday, available in highly limited quantities. They are printed on synthetic polymer and include several security features. The art on the bills tells a story of Cochrane’s history and values, from the First Nations People, before it was called Cochrane,  to the first settlers in the region, to how the history touches our current lives and still standing local businesses.

Watch: Cochrane Dollars Unveiling

Cochrane hopes this will bolster their local economy by keeping money local, as well as drawing in customers from the surrounding region such as Calgary. This would support local businesses, which have several reasons to get involved, including the free advertising the novelty effect provides, and the generation of repeat business by providing cash back or change in the currency. By supporting the local businesses, the initiative supports local employment as well.

This came into being as a collaboration between the Town of Cochrane Economic Development, ATB Financial (Cochrane branch) and the Cochrane Monetary Foundation.

How to get involved

The dollars can be acquired at ATB Financial in Cochrane, where every dollar in circulation is backed by one in the bank, as well as in general circulation for the stores accepting and giving change in Cochrane Dollars.

Over 30 local stores are already accepting the currency including MacKay’s Cochrane Ice Cream, Tim’s Gourmet Pizza, Stitching Corner and many more seen in the business directory. Local business can sign up on this site as well.

You can find more information at the Cochrane Dollar Website and official videos about Cochrane Dollars on the Town of Cochrane Youtube Channel.

To find out more about Complementary Currencies visit the Complementary Currency Resource Center.

Have an amazing day!

Evelyn

Calgary Dollars Team

Where to Spend Your Calgary Dollars

There are many places you can spend your Calgary Dollars! 

Businesses Licenses:

The City of Calgary now allows for you to pay in 50% Calgary Dollars for business licenses. If you don’t have enough C$, you can get C$ Gift Certificates in place of them. Contact us to find out more info.

Arusha Centre: 

We sell transit tickets, Mountain Equipment Coop (MEC) gift cards. We also accept Calgary Dollars and cash for our Arusha memberships (C$25 or $25) which gives you access to our PA system, tents, printing/scanning, and button-makers.

Give us a call if you want to check supplies, or just come on down to #106, 223 12th Avenue SW, Calgary. Ph: 403.270.3200.

C$ Listings Site:

You can go online to arrange selling and buying goods and services with other Calgary Dollars members. Just visit our listings site to get started.

Struggling with the listings?

  1. Tips for a successful listing
  2. How to post a listing
  3. Upkeep
  4. Finding goods and services

 

  1. Tips for a Successful Listing:
  • Make sure to include details such as estimated costs, and the amount of C$ accepted.
  • Including a picture helps liven things up and draw attention!
  • Make sure all contact information is up to date, and the best way to reach you. To do so, login.
  • You can post multiple listings.
  1. How to Post a listing
  • Go online to our listing site.
  • Login to your account. Can’t remember your account email address, we can help you update your information. Just let us know.
  • Select “publish an add for free” in the top right.
  • Fill out the information with a brief description of what you are offering.
  • Keep in mind the tips above!
  • Post and you’re done! 
  1. Upkeep

Don’t forget to delete old listings, or to repost to keep it fresh. Double check contact information, so those trying to get in touch are not sending to an abandoned email address.

  1. Finding services

Not seeing what you’re looking for? Let us know what services you need so we can try and help you find them. Or let the community know by posting a listing in our “Wanted” category.

If you need any assistance, contact us online or give us a call at 403-270-8002.

That’s all for now, hope you have an amazing day!

SI Series #15: Urban Innovation in Climate Change

Urban centres are the greatest contributors to climate change. Worldwide, cities account for 78% of carbon emissions from human activities (Burch, Schroeder, Rayner & Wilson, 2013; Stern, 2007) and as the increase in population of people living in cities in developing counties is estimated to rise 13% from 2005 to 2030 (Stern, 2007), the effect will increase. In urban centres temperatures could rise greater than 4˚C by 2025 compared to pre-industrial levels, and in peak season, temperatures could be even as high as 6˚C to 8˚C (IPCC, 2014). The number of hot days could increase the urban heat island effect, which is an increase of temperature in cities compared to surrounding regions due to concentration of built structures, smog and other human activity. Climate change thus poses risks for humans in cities (and elsewhere). Increasing temperatures impose health risks, flooding can damage property and infrastructure, drought and water scarcity can increase water shortages and related diseases, and food security may be compromised (IPCC, 2014). Every sector of human life may be effected.

Mark Unrau

(Copyright Mark Unrau)

Indeed, climate change is a problem that cannot be neatly bound within one sector; all social systems have their impacts and will be impacted. Organisation of social structures in a large metropolitan area, like waste management for example, determine which standards are to be followed, which in turn influences how emissions from waste impact climate change. Decisions in urban centres are compartmentalized despite having a rather singular effect (GHG emissions). Thus, as Burch et al. points out, cities are “thus a multidimensional—multisector, multiactor, and multilevel—phenomenon” (2013, p. 824), which are unified by the complex social problem that all cities face.

As the UN report on Climate Change and Urbanization suggests (Satterthwaite, 2008), there needs to be development and adaptation in urban centres, in conjunction. As cities develop, development goals need to include climate change mitigation strategies, via sustainable and whole systems thinking. When this occurs, local governments will be more apt to be adaptive to the continuing implications of climate change, before the impacts create imposing repercussions. National Adaptation Programmes of Action (NAPAs) and community-based adaptation creates initial starting points for policy and action oriented programming. However, just these two approaches “leaves out the key role of local government (although some community-based adaptation has involved local governments). There need to be local LAPAs and city CAPAs to underpin and drive innovations in NAPAs” (Satterhwaite, 2008, p. 17).

Thus, local governments in concert with community, provincial and federal efforts can create spaces for a diversity of social innovations that can be then enacted by local governments and non-profit organisations. The adaptive capacity of urban centres needs to happen as a concert effort, i.e., an effort of all actors in the system, with a focus on social innovations of development strategies. This may mean that all sectors need to reconsider the relationship that social structures have with the cityscape. In other words: how can we individually and collectively grow our cities adaptively, considering climate change?

– Mike Unrau

 

Burch, S.; Schroeder, H.; Rayner, S. & Wilson, J. (2013). Novel multisector networks and entrepreneurship: The role of small business in the multilevel governance of climate change. Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy, 31, 822-840.

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). (2014). Climate change 2014: Synthesis report, summary for policymakers. Contribution of working groups I, II and III to the fourth assessment report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. IPCC, Geneva, Switzerland. Retrieved from http://www.ipcc.ch/pdf/assessment-report/ar5/syr/AR5_SYR_FINAL_SPM.pdf

Satterthwaite, D. & the United Nations Expert Group Meeting On Population Distribution, Urbanization, Internal Migration and Development (2008). Climate change and urbanization: Effects and implications for urban governance. United Nations Secretariat, New York, United States. Retrieved from http://www.un.org/esa/population/meetings/EGM_PopDist/P16_Satterthwaite.pdf

Stern, N. H., & Great Britain. (2007). The economics of climate change: The Stern review. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.